118th

02-08 June 1916: Welcome to Hurontobercanadunardrenomaagnoleohydro City

George Rumpel (10 May 1850 – 05 June 1916) “He remained warm-hearted, fair and diplomatic. His employees liked him for this and because wealth did not deprive him of his genial, companionable attribute. Without ostentation, he was considerate of and helpful to those in unfortunate circumstances.” Berliners were rocked by the sudden death of former […] Read more…

19-25 May 1916: Bye-bye, Berlin! Bye-bye, Boys!

15 May 1916: Colonel Lochead’s open letter to Berliners Regarding the reports apparently more or less generally circulated throughout the City, that the officers, NCOs, and men of the 118th Battalion mean to take an active part in the election slated for Friday, I beg to state that I myself and every other officer of […] Read more…

12-18 May 1916: Mayor Hett in the hot seat

A ripple of excitement on the Bay of Berlin The Berlin Daily Telegraph did a mini-exposé on William Kingsley, the man behind the injunction to stop the name change vote. A riffle through recruiting office files revealed he was a socialist slacker—this allowed a nebulous tie-in to the anti-name changer group with enemy aliens. Without […] Read more…

05-11 May 1916: Pennies, pasteurisation and popcorn

The ladies’ ten-day recruitment campaign ended without either fanfare or an inkling of results–except to say empty bunks meant a last-ditch sign-up campaign had to be launched. Recruitment meetings continued to attract “the usual crowd” of ladies and old tigers; eligible, fit young men were nowhere to be found. Woe betides these slackers, for “they […] Read more…

28 Apr – 04 May 1916: If you don’t go, we will!

Irish Uprising News from Ireland was slow and—at least at first–sparse. Apart from cut communications lines, London’s censors vetted the uprising’s details, leaving many in the dark. By the end of this week—10 days after the rebellion began—more than 100 people were killed or wounded, the street fighting subsided, and more than 1000 insurgents were […] Read more…

21-27 Apr 1916: A big, warm time was had by all

St Julien Day 22 April 1915 marked the first time a large quantity of deadly gas was deployed in battle.  On that date, the Germans unleashed 160 tons of asphyxiating gas on Allied soldiers at Ypres.  The unsuspecting men were not equipped to handle the yellow-green chlorine cloud that smelled of pineapples and pepper. Some […] Read more…

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